2017 Presentation Slides and Handouts

 

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A Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation Prevention Technical Assistance Resource Guide

Workshop Description:

Schools and youth-serving organizations are in a unique position to help youth shape positive attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that work to prevent sexual abuse and exploitation. The Georgia Statewide Human Trafficking Task Force, led by the Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, recently released Georgia’s Child Sexual Abuse & Exploitation Prevention Technical Assistance Resource Guide to specifically address child sexual abuse and exploitation within the sexual violence continuum. Specifically, the guide discusses how communities can engage in prevention strategies to improve the health and well-being of their youth population. This presentation will provide participants with background on principles of prevention, developing a prevention plan, age appropriate teaching suggestions, analysis of specific child-focused prevention programs, and guidelines for implementation and evaluation.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Tiffany Sawyer joined the Georgia Center for Child Advocacy as the Director of Prevention Services in 2006. In her capacity at the Georgia Center, Tiffany oversees the Center’s statewide abuse prevention initiative which has trained over 100,000 adults since 2006. Prior to her work in Georgia she worked as the Associate Director of Programs at Darkness to Light, a national non-profit for the prevention of child sexual abuse. While at Darkness to Light, she assisted in the creation of the Stewards of Children training curriculum and helped to launch the program on national and international levels. Sawyer currently serves as a national leader on the National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. She was appointed by Governor Nathan Deal in August 2014 to serve on the Georgia Child Fatality Review Panel as the Prevention Specialist. Tiffany has conducted over 500 trainings and presentations both nationally and internationally throughout her career.

Michelle Anderson, MS, currently serves as the “Planning and Policy Development Specialist II” in the Family Violence Unit at the Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. Within that role, Michelle coordinates and monitors the work of the Georgia Statewide Human Trafficking Task Force by directing the development and implementation of the initiatives that are produced within it. Concurrently, Michelle also coordinates the programmatic aspects of all TANF-funded human trafficking research, evaluation, and trainings presently being conducted throughout the State of Georgia; serves on the Senate Bill 8: Safe Harbor “Service Delivery Plan Development Committee;” provides input at local, state, and national CSEC strategic planning meetings; presents at conferences on behalf of CJCC as the agency’s CSEC-subject-matter-expert; and conducts formal CSEC trainings throughout the State of Georgia.

Case Studies: Racial Disparities in the Referral and Medical Evaluation of Child Abuse Cases

Workshop Description:

The purpose of this presentation is to identify and discuss racial disparities in the referral of child abuse cases and pursuant medical evaluation of these cases. Dr. Artis will discuss child abuse statistics and give an overview of factors that may result in racial disparities in child abuse evaluations, with examples and case studies from her medical experience. She will also cover the concept of racial bias and how it can affect medical care by offering discussion on current literature on the topic of disparities in child abuse allegations.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

Adrianne Artis, M.D., completed medical school at Howard University College of Medicine in Washington D.C. and then completed her general pediatrics residency at The University of Florida at Orlando Health, in Orlando, Florida. During residency, Dr. Artis became especially interested in caring for children who were suspected to be victims of abuse. Dr. Artis therefore, decided to pursue a career in Child Abuse Pediatrics and is currently completing her fellowship at Emory University. Dr. Artis provides services through Emory University, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and The Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children. As part of her training, Dr. Artis has completed evaluations for cases of neglect, suspected physical and sexual abuse, she has given lectures to local and national audiences, testified in court cases, and is involved in medical education. Dr. Artis’ fellowship research topic of interest is racial disparities. Through her research, Dr. Artis hopes to bring awareness to the disparities in the evaluation and diagnosis of children who are suspected victims of abuse.

Child Exploitation Investigations

This presentation will explore the growing connection between child sexual exploitation and technology. Social media applications are widely being used by online predators to gain access to our children. This presentation will also discuss how these cases are reported and investigated by law enforcement.

Presenter:

Special Agent April Griffith, M.S., received a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from the University of Georgia and a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Georgia State University. April Griffith is a Special Agent with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and has been employed as such since September 2007. SA Griffith was first assigned to the GBI’s Region 1 office in Calhoun, Georgia where she was the Child Abuse Specialist for approximately five years. SA Griffith was transferred to the GBI’s Child Exploitation and Computer Crimes Unit in November of 2016. SA Griffith has received extensive training in the field of child abuse and child exploitation and has provided instruction to numerous groups in the area of child abuse.

Healthy Outcomes From Positive Experiences (HOPE): The Role of Social Norms

Workshop Description:

The deleterious effects of early adversity and trauma are well-documented, yet far less is known about the factors that promote health and well-being of children. New data on the role of Healthy Outcomes from Positive Experiences (HOPE) demonstrate that children fare well when they have safe and supportive relationships with caregivers and when societal norms promote healthy parent-child relationships (Sege et al., 2017).

In this presentation, the concept of “HOPE” will be introduced along with findings from a recently released research report (HOPE report). The bulk of the presentation will focus on the concept of social norms: what are they, why are they important, and how do we understand them? Examples of social norms surveys related to child abuse and neglect will be presented along with key findings from the HOPE report.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

J. Bart Klika, Ph.D., is the Chief Research and Strategy Officer with the national organization Prevent Child Abuse America . His research examines the causes and consequences associated with child abuse and neglect in an effort to prevent its occurrence. On multiple occasions, Dr. Klika served as a research consultant for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examining issues related to the prevention of child abuse and neglect. In 2011, he was selected for the inaugural cohort of fellows for the Doris Duke Fellowship for the Promotion of Child Well-Being, a national fellowship providing support and mentorship for doctoral students seeking innovations in the prevention of child abuse and neglect. Dr. Klika is on the national Board of Directors for APSAC and is the chair of the APSAC prevention committee. Recently, Dr. Klika served as the senior editor for the APSAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment (4th Ed.). for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) examining issues related to the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

 Infant Crying and Sleep

Workshop Description:

This workshop will help guide you in having conversations with caregivers regarding their infant’s sleep and crying. All babies sleep (or don’t sleep) and all babies cry, so how can we support new parents in dealing with and responding to a crying infant in a healthy and safe manner? We will learn about and discuss, the Period of PURPLE crying, preventing shaken baby syndrome, and preventing sleep-related deaths.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

Terri Miller, MPH, CHES, spent 6 years working within child welfare as a case manager before transitioning to public health in 2007. She has worked within injury prevention and maternal child health since that time in various roles. Her current role is to manage the Georgia Safe to Sleep Campaign for the Georgia Department of Public Health.

 Let’s Talk About Suicide

Workshop Description:

Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death in children ages 15-19 and the 3rd leading cause of death in ages 14-15. Understanding the risk factors and tips to identify children at risk is a key component of prevention. This presentation will address keys to prevention and identify what Georgia is doing to address this crisis.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

Erin Harlow-Parker APRN, MS, PMHCNS-BC has been a child and adolescent psychiatric nurse for 29 years. She received her undergraduate degree from Rhode Island College and a master’s degree in child and adolescent psychiatric nursing from Northeastern University. She has been an ANCC board certified child and adolescent psychiatric clinical nurse specialist for 24 years. She has worked extensively in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric specialty areas. She has been a member of the psychiatric consult team at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta since 2007. In the last year, she has become a member of the Georgia DOE suicide prevention task force and begun to collaborate with the GBI and other state agencies to address the increase in completed suicides in our state.

 Investigating and Working Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy Cases

 Workshop Description:

This presentation will give the audience a multidisciplinary perspective to approaching Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy cases in the clinical setting. You will hear case analysis from a child abuse pediatrician and social worker as to the investigation and assessment of MSbP cases. This session will describe Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, offer best practices on identifying this type of maltreatment, and address common questions regarding these cases of abuse.

 

Presenters:

Tamika Bryant, M.D. received her Bachelor’s Degree in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. It was during her undergraduate education in Baltimore that she first became interested in the Child Advocacy field while working as an interview facilitator at the Baltimore Child Abuse Center. She went on to obtain her medical degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School and her pediatric residency training at the University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital. Dr. Bryant completed a 3 year fellowship specializing in Child Abuse Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Of The King’s Daughters in Norfolk, Virginia, where she assessed suspected child abuse cases, testified in court cases and lectured to medical and investigative audiences on issues related to child abuse. Most recently, Dr. Bryant is a Child Abuse Pediatrician in the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and directs the Child Abuse Pediatrics Fellowship at CHOA. She is also a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Section on Child Abuse and Neglect; and a member of the Ray Helfer Society, an honorary society for physicians specializing in child abuse.

Wilma Wheeler, MSW, LCSW, is the Manager of Social Work for Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite. She’s been with the organization for over 25 years in various roles. She has her Masters in Social Work and is a licensed clinical social worker. She currently supervises a team of over 40 social workers who’re all master’s prepared. She provides campus oversight to child protection matters and serves as an Administrator for a hospital Child Abuse Crisis Team.

 Child Welfare Policy and Legislative Update

 Workshop Description:

Child advocates of all professional disciplines are well-positioned to use their role to assist the child welfare system to transform itself. To be effective catalysts for change requires familiarity with the cycle of public policy development and skill at engaging in policymaking processes. Most critically, it requires knowledge of changes in the law and the dominant public policy themes and priorities that drive those changes. This session will introduce participants to a disciplined approach to public policy formation, identifying points of access and advocacy opportunities. Following that introduction, participants will be provided with an update on recent changes made to Georgia’s child welfare law and a forecast of proposals anticipated at the federal and state levels.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

Melissa Carter, J.D., is a Clinical Professor of Law at Emory Law School and Executive Director of the Barton Child Law and Policy Center. In that role, she is responsible for the administration of the Center, directing the public policy and legislative advocacy clinics, and teaching a related course in child welfare law and policy. Melissa has contributed to the drafting and passage of dozens of pieces of legislation, including the 2013 Juvenile Justice Reform Act which comprehensively revised and modernized the state’s Juvenile Code. She is a frequent presenter and has authored several publications on juvenile law topics. She is the Secretary of the Board of Directors for the Multi-Agency Alliance for Children, an advisor to the Supreme Court of Georgia Committee on Justice for Children and to ChildKind, Inc., and a member of the Policy Committee of Voices for Georgia’s Children.

 Trauma Informed Practices: Making the Most of Your Day

 Workshop Description:

Shanta Dube will provide a presentation that will apply over 20 years of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study research findings to discuss the “Why and How of Trauma-Informed Care”™. The presentation will begin with the “Why” by providing an overview of the ACE Study findings: data are presented to demonstrate ACEs are common, co-occur, and can negatively impact healthy brain development, which puts children at risk for a plethora of negative health and educational outcomes. The presentation will then focus on the “How” by presenting a two-generational approach for trauma-informed care. Self-care is introduced through an overview of Ayurvedic Medicine principles and experiential learning through group-based activities that Dr. Dube will lead. The activities will focus on stress management and wellbeing as it applies to implementing trauma-informed care.

Presenter:

Shanta R. Dube, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA and Founder and Principal for Vision of Wellness, LLC (A VOW for Health). She specializes in epidemiologic research focused on early adversity as risk factors for negative health outcomes and also on trauma survivorship, recovery, and healing. Before taking a faculty position at GSU, Dube was Lead Health Scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she was one of the early investigators on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Shanta received CDC scientific recognition for her work on the ACE Study and awarded the CDC Honor award for Epidemiologic Research for her groundbreaking scientific publications on the childhood determinants of adult health. Shanta has published widely on the topic of childhood determinants of health, adolescent health, substance use/abuse, and trauma survivorship. She is currently Associate Editor for Child Abuse and Neglect.

Promoting Great Childhood Outcomes: Effective and Fun Ways to Communicate and Have Your Message Heard

 Workshop Description:

Join Polly McKinney and Andrea Cervone as they guide you through some creative ways to communicate about policy, practice, and ideas. Using examples from their work for Voices for Georgia’s Children and other clients, Polly and Andrea will talk about the philosophy of their communication strategies and how to develop tools for your own work.

 

Presenters:

Polly McKinney has been Advocacy Director at Voices for Georgia’s Children since 2010. She recently started her own strategic communications company, Long Game Strategies, LLC, allowing her to enhance and continue her work at Voices, while creating content for clients and causes akin to child advocacy issues. She serves on the Georgia School Based Health Alliance board as well as on the Advisory Board of the National Juvenile Justice Network, and is chair of the ChildKind, Inc. Board of Directors. At the pleasure of Governor Nathan Deal, McKinney also serves on the Juvenile Justice State Advisory Board as well as the Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative state steering committee. Prior to her work in child policy, McKinney developed communications for Southern States Energy Board, served as Executive Director of the League of Women Voters of Georgia and spent more than two decades in various production capacities in the Georgia film industry, which included two regional Emmy nominations and the writing and production of the introductory film at the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site.

Andrea Cervone currently serves as Communications Director for the statewide nonprofit organization Voices for Georgia’s Children, and as the lead communications consultant for Tarte Creative, a full-service digital media marketing firm.  Andrea has worked on various campaigns at both the state and local level.  Andrea is Inbound Marketing certified and specializes in communications and message development, graphic design, photography and social media management.

 Tools That Work to Overcome Poverty Barriers

Workshop Description:

The impacts of poverty do not stop at the door. People are bombarded daily with worries: Will we have a place to live/place to sleep? Will we have enough food to eat? Will our cars be towed? Will our lights be shut off? In this session, Dr. Donna M. Beegle supplies strategies for making the information provided to people living in the crisis of poverty more purposeful, meaningful, and useful.

Presenter:

Donna Beegle, Ph.D., After growing up in generational migrant-labor poverty, leaving school at 15 to get married, and having two children while continuing to cope with poverty, Donna Beegle found herself—at 25—with no husband, little education, and no job skills. Within 10 short years, she gained the confidence to get her GED and advance through to a Doctorate Degree. All these experiences provide Dr. Beegle with an authentic voice to speak, write, and train across the nation to break the iron cage of poverty.

As president of Communication Across Barriers, a consulting firm dedicated to building poverty informed communities that are armed with tools to break barriers, she works directly with children and adults currently in poverty, as well as all professionals who want to make a difference for those living in the crisis of poverty. For over 27 years, Dr. Beegle’s work has spread word of mouth to all 50 states and six countries. Dr. Beegle is also the founder of the Opportunity Community movement which provides the foundation for a contemporary war on poverty.

 Ask the Experts: Multidisciplinary Considerations for Working with CSEC Victims

 Workshop Description:

This presentation will offer a multidisciplinary perspective to our audience, with special consideration given to the legal, medical, and advocacy disciplines. This panel presentation will serve as an open forum for attendees to ask questions as it relates to the issue of child sex trafficking. The panelists will also share their experiences working with victims of human trafficking and their efforts to address the complex needs of these victims.

Presenters:

Irina Khasin, J.D., is a Chief Senior Assistant District Attorney at the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office, where she has prosecuted crimes against women and children since 2011. Irina received her Bachelor of Arts degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Southern California in 2006 and her Juris Doctorate from Vanderbilt University Law School in 2009. Following graduation, she served as a Law Clerk to The Honorable C. Lynwood Smith, Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama before working at Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton, LLP as a civil litigation associate. Since joining the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office, Irina has successfully conducted more than 30 jury trials as lead prosecutor with a 100% conviction rate. Recognizing her commitment to advocacy for victims of sexual assault and exploitation, District Attorney Paul L. Howard, Jr. appointed Irina as the Director of the Human Trafficking Unit in 2015 as well as the Deputy Director of the Crimes Against Women & Children Unit in 2017.

Marni Dodd, DNP, received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Regents University and went on to University of Tennessee to achieve her Doctor of Nursing Practice, specializing as a Family Nurse Practitioner with a forensic focus. Marni is also a certified Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner for adolescents, adults, and pediatrics. Marni has been conducting clinical research in the field of Child Sex Trafficking since 2013 and has been specializing in treating victims of assault, including victims of exploitation since 2004. Currently, Marni is a Nurse Practitioner at the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta where she examines and treats alleged victims of child maltreatment. She also serves as adjunct faculty at Athens Technical College, where she teaches students in the Emergency Medical Services Department.

Jennifer Swain, Jennifer Swain presently works as the Deputy Director for youthSpark, Inc. (formerly the Juvenile Justice Fund) where she oversees the strategic implementation of current programs and community education initiatives as well as manages other internal activities of the organization. Prior to the current position, Jennifer served as the Program Director where her influential vision aided in the development of youthSpark Voices, the unique early intervention program to reach girls deemed high-risk for trafficking involvement or who do not self-identify as victims of commercial sexual exploitation. She speaks and trains various groups on the trafficking issue, as well as presenting at various local and national conferences on victim identification and early intervention. She has worked as a consultant with groups working to build community collaborations and strategies to address this problem. She is a founding member of the Georgia Statewide Human Trafficking Task Force—serving on the Keeping At-Risk Youth Safe work group. Additionally, Swain provides expert witness testimony for DeKalb Superior Court cases.

 

 Making a Report with CICC

 Workshop Description:

Reports of suspected child abuse and neglect must be made to DFCS immediately, or no later than 24 hours after suspecting abuse. CPS Intake Communication Center (CICC) receives, processes, and assesses all reports of child abuse and neglect made in the state of Georgia. This presentation highlights CICCs structure and ways to make a report. Participants will understand our new intake assessment model, including questions that will be asked when making a report, and will understand the system of making a report.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Melanie Curylo, LMSW is a Social Service Administrator with the Department of Family and Children Services (DFCS) CPS Intake Communication Center (CICC) unit. She previously worked as a Case Manager and Supervisor with Fulton County DFCS beginning in 2010, and joined CICC with the first phase of the statewide roll-out in 2013. Melanie manages a cluster of approximately 25 staff members, whose responsibilities include answering the child abuse and neglect reporting hotline, assessing whether reports meet Georgia’s criteria for abuse and neglect, and assessing safety concerns. Melanie received a Master’s in Social Work from the University of Georgia in 2009.

Chad Mahan, MS, is the Lead Social Services Administrator for the Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) CPS Intake Communication Center (CICC). Chad began his career in 2007 at Gilmer County DFCS as an investigations and intake case manager and moved to CICC in 2013 as a supervisor and workflow manager. He leads a cluster of approximately 25 workers, along with CICC’s Continuous Quality Improvement Team. He has also helped manage projects to improve intake practices in Georgia including developing intuitive decision-making software to bring consistency to intake assessments, designing and implementing a new intake model, and introducing a child abuse prevention campaign known as the “Before We Knock” Campaign.

 Five Strategies to Prevent Child Abuse

Workshop Description:

The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the five key strategies the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified for preventing child abuse and neglect, as outlined in the recent technical package. Specifically, the session will include the WHY, WHAT, WHO and HOW of implementing the strategies:

  • WHY: background work leading up to strategy development, why strategies are broader than just “programs”, links to the Essentials for Childhood goal areas; connections to other forms of violence prevention.
  • WHAT: an overview of the strategies and approaches and what’s needed to move strategies to action.
  • WHO: key sector involvement for each strategy.
  • HOW: discussion of how the strategies (as a whole) can be used; overall strategy implementation ideas; and if time allows, small group activities to think through how to implement a specific strategy or strategies; how to engage non-traditional sector/champions and why they are important.
 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Sandra P. Alexander, MEd, is a recognized national leader, strategic thinker, and innovator in child abuse prevention with over 47 years’ experience in the public and private sector. Her leadership experience includes serving as Executive Director of two Prevent Child Abuse America state chapters. For the past ten years, she has been an Expert Consultant/Subject Matter Expert in child maltreatment prevention in the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and currently continues this work at CDC as a contractor working with KARNA LLC. At CDC, she has provided leadership for several key child maltreatment prevention initiatives including DVP’s BECAUSE KIDS COUNT initiative, Knowledge to Action Child Maltreatment Prevention Consortium, a cross-division shaken baby prevention initiative and the Essentials for Childhood initiative.

Beverly L. Fortson, PhD, currently works as a behavioral scientist on the Child Maltreatment and Sexual Violence Team in the Research and Evaluation Branch of the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In her current position, she focuses on research examining the effectiveness of interventions in preventing child maltreatment and sexual violence. Dr. Fortson received her B.S. in psychology from the University of Georgia in Athens, GA, and her MA and PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV. She completed a predoctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, SC, and a postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and has provided clinical services to children and families for over 16 years.

 Domestic Violence and Child Abuse: Linkages and Safe Reporting

Workshop Description:

This presentation will discuss the recent developments in mandated reporting law and the potential impacts on families and victims of domestic violence. Audience members will learn some of the links between domestic violence and child abuse, discuss the reporting process for children witnessing domestic violence, and identify two resources that could be provided to adult domestic violence victims.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Angie Boy, DrPH, is the Program Manager for prevention and education at the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. In this role, she is responsible for overseeing the implementation of multiple projects related to child abuse and neglect including child sex trafficking, prevention of child sexual abuse, and mandated reporting of child abuse and neglect. Dr. Boy directly manages a partnership program with the Division of Family and Children’s Services designed to provide training on medically based topics to frontline DFCS staff. She also oversees the management of a DFCS/CHOA partnership that is working to build a network of medical providers around the state who can provide exams for children who are suspected victims of abuse and/or neglect. Dr. Boy is working with the Blank Center’s Child Abuse Pediatrics fellow on research related to racial disparities in reporting of suspected child abuse and neglect. Dr. Boy also serves as the co-leader of the Intentional Injury Work Group for the Children’s Injury Prevention Program (ChIPP). Prior to coming to Children’s Healthcare, Angie worked for the GA Coalition Against Domestic Violence as the Project Connect Coordinator.

Allison Smith, MSW, Allison Smith-Burk is the Director of Public Policy and lobbyist for the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence (GCADV), where she has served since August 2005. She has worked in the domestic violence movement for over twelve years, including her tenure at GCADV and at the Northwest Georgia Family Crisis Center in Dalton, Georgia. Along with her work to address domestic violence, Allison worked for many years in public child welfare at the Clarke County Department of Family and Children Services and in homelessness intervention at the Athens Area Homeless Shelter. Allison has special expertise in the area of public policy and systems advocacy, economic abuse and economic security for survivors, and the intersection of domestic violence and child maltreatment.

 Gathering the Pieces and Putting Them Together: Working a Medical Based Child Abuse Case

Workshop Description:

The purpose of this workshop is to provide attendees with an understanding of the multifaceted nature of approaching a medical-based child abuse case. After attending this lecture, participants will be able to understand the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to working a child abuse case and recall the specifics of a case vital to making an assessment of abuse. In addition, participants will further understand the role of medical findings in these cases and how the determination of abuse is made.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Stephen A. Messner, MD, earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Richmond. In 2001, he completed his medical school training at the Medical College of Virginia and followed that with the completion of his pediatric residency at the University of Florida. Dr. Messner stayed at the University of Florida as a faculty member in the general pediatrics division where he saw patients for not only general pediatric issues, but also for concerns of abuse and neglect. After being on faculty in Florida for 3 years, Dr. Messner joined the Child Protection Team at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta in the summer of 2007. He was appointed Medical Director in January of 2016. Dr. Messner is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a member of the Georgia AAP section on child abuse.

Peggy Woodard, is a Child Death, Near Fatality and Serious Injury (CDNFSI) Specialist with Georgia’s Division of Family and Children Services, currently working within the Division’s Knowledge Management Section to track and analyze their CDNFSI cases. She also maintains her role as a DFCS Liaison to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta that started in 2004. Ms. Woodard has 40 years of combined experience in the field of criminal justice and child welfare, investigating difficult cases of child abuse and neglect. She is a graduate of the Florida State University’s School of Criminology.

 Prevention of Child Abuse Through Financial Education

 Workshop Description:

This workshop will discuss how to implement a financial literacy program for youth and adults within agencies and organizations without breaking their budget. Understanding the mindset and frame of reference when serving those in the under-served communities we will: discuss why it is imperative to teach financial literacy with hope and integrity as part of the cornerstones of the program as well as define what that looks like; discuss components of a financial literacy course that must be included for a robust and effective approach to aiding someone to become financially independent or self-sufficient and share a sampling of our proven proprietary Financial Literacy course that is currently being used at Prevent Child Abuse Rockdale as well as other agencies/organizations.

TANGIBLES: Handouts, Budgeting Tools, Investing Tools and other resources

 Presentation Slides 

Presenter:

Minister Annie Bell was reared in military schools throughout the U.S. and abroad. She furthered her education at Liberty University majoring in Psychology-Life Coaching, Religious Studies and minoring in Christian Counseling. She received her ordination from Bread of Life Ministerial Association. Currently she is the Founder/Chairperson and Executive Director of Wealth Management Ministries, Inc. as she endeavors to bridge the gap between the rich and the poor financial literacy and Christian Counseling. In addition, as an Author, Radio Show Host, Advance Life Coach, Wealth Coach and Christian Counselor, she opened the counseling arm of the organization in 2015 to offer Life Coaching, Wealth Coaching and Christian Counseling to the under-served communities. I R.E.I.G.N. ®, founded by Min. Bell, is an outreach of the counseling arm of Wealth Management Ministries, Inc., It is a Victorious Lifestyle Brand that serves the national and international communities through: Talk Radio Show, workshops, conferences, books and workbooks.

 

 Implementing Home Visiting with Fathers: A Review of the SafeCare Dad2K Program

 Workshop Description:

This workshop will provide an overview of the SafeCare Dad2K program as well as emerging findings for the program’s feasibility and efficacy with at-risk fathers. The SafeCare Dad2K program focuses on training fathers in parent-child interaction skills with evidence for reducing risk of child physical abuse and neglect. Special topics will include how to best engage fathers in home visiting, and how to keep fathers motivated for participation in parenting programs. Participants will receive handouts and see video clips used in the Dad2K program.

 Presentation Slides 

Presenters:

Shannon Self-Brown, PhD, received her PhD in clinical psychology from the Louisiana State University in 2004, and completed an NIMH-sponsored postdoctoral fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina in 2006. From 2006-2008, she completed a Research Fellowship within the Division of Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she served as a behavioral scientist for projects testing technology-based parenting programs targeting child maltreatment prevention. Dr. Self-Brown is currently a Professor in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. She serves as the Associate Director of Research for the National SafeCare Training and Research Center, and the Director of the PhD Program for the School of Public Health. Dr. Self-Brown is a federally-funded Investigator with CDC, NIH and NCTSN. She has over 50 peer-reviewed publications focusing on the impact of violence and disaster exposure on youth mental health, as well as the implementation of evidence-based behavioral parenting programs and mental health practices for traumatized youth.

Clinton Boyd, Jr. is a Doctoral Student in the Department of Sociology at Georgia State University. Mr. Boyd’s research interests include father involvement, early childhood development, racial and neighborhood inequality, place-based social policy, criminal justice policy reform, and evidence-based practice and policy. Additionally, Mr. Boyd has given public speeches about the effects of mass incarceration on the African-American community, specifically African-American fathers, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Georgia’s Department of Family and Child Services, and the DeKalb County Board of Health. Mr. Boyd also received the Doris Duke (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago) and ZERO TO THREE (Washington, D.C.) predoctoral fellowships to explore how the parenting practices of African-American fathers can potentially promote child and community well-being in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Akilah Thomas, MPH, obtained her Master’s in Public Health from Emory University in 2000 and her Bachelor’s in Sociology from Clark Atlanta University in 1999. Since 2011 Ms. Thomas has been working for the National SafeCare Training and Research Center (NSTRC) as a Senior Training Specialist. Ms. Thomas serves as a co-trainer for all Department of Human Services (DHS) SafeCare trainings in the State of Georgia and as a lead-trainer and co-trainer for National SafeCare Trainings. In addition to training Providers on the SafeCare curriculum, Ms. Thomas also provides direct services to families for Federally Funded Projects. With NSTRC, not only does she train professionals to properly deliver SafeCare to families at risk for child maltreatment, but Ms. Thomas also was part of a research program, called Dad2K. Prior to working for NSTRC, Ms. Thomas was the Project Director for the Building Strong Families Program (BSF).

 

2018 Newsletters