PCA Georgia Media Toolkit

While April is Child Abuse Prevention Month (CAP Month), child abuse happens everyday. Our efforts to prevent child abuse should be year round! Please use these tools to help  promote awareness, educate the general public, and also target specific audiences. These tools are intended for general child abuse prevention, CAP Month, the 1-800-CHILDREN Helpline, and Pinwheels for Prevention®. 

pinwheel-head-onlyOrder Pinwheels from PCA Georgia’s online store! Or email Julia Neighbors, jneighbors@gsu.edu, for more information.

 

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia takes part in the  national signature campaign, Pinwheels for Prevention®, Prevent Child Abuse America is introducing the pinwheel as a symbol for child abuse and neglect prevention nationwide. It represents the healthy and happy childhoods and bright futures all children deserve. It is designed  to communicate efforts and change the way our state thinks about prevention. PCA GA encourages community activities and the support of public policies that prioritize healthy child development and child abuse prevention right from  the start! To learn more, visit www.pinwheelsforprevention.org.

Why

Georgia was ranked 42nd in the nation for child wellbeing, we can do better! PCA GA applies research and engages people to advocate for children, increase awareness, spread knowledge of evidence-based prevent programs, and support communities in their efforts.  Each year thousands of pinwheels are planted in “pinwheels gardens” or used in other creative ways by our partners in the community in conjunction with public service announcements, social media outreach, and educational materials to raise awareness of child abuse prevention.

How does it work?

The pinwheel is reflective of the bright futures that all children deserve and serves as our new brand symbol for child abuse and neglect prevention. Its uplifting symbolism encourages public engagement. Pinwheels for Prevention provides an opportunity for everyone to take action by learning more about prevention, supporting child and family friendly policies and services, and volunteering at the local, state and national levels.

Connect to a Local Prevent Child Abuse Georgia Chapter

PCA Georgia supports 20 local councils throughout the state of Georgia that are dedicated to preventing child abuse and neglect in all forms. Many provide direct services and act as prevention advocates in their community during the month of April and year round. Connect to a council near you to participate in CAP Month activities and learn more about prevention in your community.

IT'S NOT TOO EARLY, place your order today for APRIL 2017

To obtain pinwheels or learn more about roles you or your organization can play, contact Prevent Child Abuse Georgia, jwalsh10@gsu.edu, or 404-413-2379

 

 

Tips: Press releases are written in a journalistic style that heavily emphasizes the “Who, What, When, Where and Why” style of information-sharing. These are often written in an “inverted pyramid” style with the most important information at top and in decreasing order of importance from there so that if a media outlet prints your press release as a news story (which happens) but can only run a portion, you have conveyed the most important information.

Press Release Sample 1 – Mentor Advocate Donate Theme

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

Contact: YOUR MEDIA CONTACT HERE
(W): YOUR Direct WORK NUMBER
(C):  YOUR Cell phone NUMBER

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia: “Make a Difference for Children and Families by getting M.A.D. this April!

Local non-profit is looking for public support during Child Abuse Prevention month

Atlanta, Georgia - Prevent Child Abuse Georgia wants all Georgians to get M.A.D. this April, but not in the way that you would think.

“We want people to get involved in their communities and in the decisions that affect their families and neighbors,” said Julia Neighbors the Director of Prevent Child Abuse Georgia.  “This year we are encouraging everyone in Georgia to commit to be a Mentor to a child or parent, Advocate for family-friendly policies, or Donate to a child-serving agency during Child Abuse Prevention Month.”

“These actions are simple ways that anyone can increase the protective factors in their community that lead to thriving children and families,” said Dan Duffy, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “We’re encouraging people to take a few minutes out of their day to learn more about child abuse prevention and how their actions can make a difference.”

According to the organization, these actions are “three simple steps anyone can take” that can have an impact on preventing abuse and neglect in their community.

For example, mentoring a child can be done in many ways, such as volunteering to staff an after-school program like a sports or academic team. Mentoring a parent can be as simple as reaching out to your neighbor.

“By mentoring, local parents can help their community in several ways, including by providing a safe place for children to go after school while parents are still working and providing opportunities to increase social connections and build relationships within the community,” said Duffy. “These help to reduce isolation and stress in parents, two of the leading risk-factors for child neglect.”

Becoming an advocate for policies that support children and families is another way to make a difference in local communities. Certain federal policies, such as the Child Abuse and Prevention Treatment Act (CAPTA) or the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting program (MIECHV), provide local funding for programs that help struggling families.

“We encourage everyone to learn more about how these policies are making an impact at a local level,” said Duffy.  “By learning about how laws like MIECHV help children and families while showing a positive return on investment, we can turn citizens into advocates for responsible policy that is good for families and taxpayers.”

Donating, too, is a quick and easy way to make a positive impact during Child Abuse Prevention Month.

“If they don’t have the time to become a mentor or an advocate, we hope people who want to make a difference consider donating to local organizations that empower children and families in their cities and state,” said Duffy. “Whether it’s your local Prevent Child Abuse Georgia chapter or a local food bank, there are many different organizations that could benefit from financial support this April.”

To learn more about how you can “get M.A.D.” and make a difference during Child Abuse Prevention Month, contact your local chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America at www.preventchildabusega.org .

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PREVENT CHILD ABUSE AMERICA, founded in 1972, is focused on changing the way our nation thinks about prevention, focusing on community activities and public policies that prioritize prevention right from the start to make sure child abuse and neglect never occur. PCA works to ensure the healthy development of children nationwide while recognizing that child development is a building block for community development and economic development.

Georgia State University’s Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, directed by Dr. John R. Lutzker, houses PCA Georgia, a state chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America. Prevent Child Abuse Georgia, directed by Julia Neighbors, is partially supported by a grant from the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services, Office of Prevention and Family Support.

Print this press release  

Press Release Sample 2 – Wear Blue Day

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

Contact: YOUR MEDIA CONTACT HERE
(W): YOUR Direct WORK NUMBER
(C):  YOUR Cell phone NUMBER

Prevent Child Abuse Georgia is turning Georgia Blue on April 7
The non-profit is encouraging everyone in Georgia to take action on behalf of children during Child Abuse Prevention Month

Atlanta, Georgia - April is a time for action on behalf of children and families according to leaders of Prevent Child Abuse Georgia.

This year, the organization is participating in Wear Blue Day in support of all children in Georgia and the great childhoods they deserve. But they’re not content just building awareness: in 2017, Prevent Child Abuse Georgia wants everyone to get involved, too.

“We know that everyone agrees that child abuse is a problem that needs to be solved, but not everyone knows that they can play an active role in preventing it in the first place,” said Julia Neighbors, Executive Director of Prevent Child Abuse Georgia. “This year we’re encouraging others to join us on Wear Blue day and then to commit to take action on behalf of children and families in Georgia.”

According to Prevent Child Abuse Georgia, there are many different ways that people can get involved in child abuse prevention. Some suggestions for 2017 include committing to mentor a child or parent, advocate for family-friendly policies, or donate to child-serving organizations. Each of these actions can increase the protective factors in a community, says Ms. Neighbors.

“We know that certain strategies work. For example, we know that family support programs can improve family self-sufficiency, setting children and parents up for future success. We also know that the more stable, caring adults in a child’s life, the more likely they are to succeed in the face of adversity,” said Ms. Neighbors “So advocating for policies like the Child Abuse Prevention Treatment Act or signing up to coach an after-school sports or academic team might not seem related, but is actually prevention in action.”

The organization encourages others to join them on April 7 for Wear Blue day and to post online to @pcageorgia.

For more information on child abuse prevention or to learn more about what you can do to help, visit Prevent Child Abuse Georgia on the web at www.preventchildabusega.org.

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Get PDF Press Release Here  

Press Release Sample 3 – Pinwheel Garden

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

Contact: YOUR MEDIA CONTACT HERE
(W): YOUR Direct WORK NUMBER
(C):  YOUR Cell phone NUMBER

PREVENT CHILD ABUSE GEORGIA TURNS LOCATION BLUE AND SILVER

‘Pinwheel garden(s)’ call(s) public to action during Child Abuse Prevention Month

To mark April’s Child Abuse Prevention Month, Prevent Child Abuse Georgia (or other organization) will be at LOCATION today to remind people we all play a role when it comes to the healthy childhood development of our communities’ children by planting a pinwheel garden at LOCATION at TIME.  Prevent Child Abuse Georgia (or other organization) will be joined by supporters from (if you have sponsors or partners, include them here. If not, delete this line).

“Pinwheel gardens planted in communities across the nation serve as powerful visual reminders that we all play a role in ensuring  happy and healthy childhoods  for all children everywhere,” said Julia Neighbors, Executive Director of Prevent Child Abuse Georgia. “Here in Georgia, we want to have the healthiest children, families and communities in the United States, and we want people to join us and learn how we plan to do that.”

This event is part of the national Pinwheels for Prevention® campaign, which has seen more than 3 million pinwheels distributed nationwide since April 2008.  In Georgia, (insert description of local Pinwheels for Prevention efforts).

“According to statistics from UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being. Numbers like these remind us that each of us has a very important role to play when it comes to guaranteeing the healthy development, and the prevention of the abuse, of our nation’s children,” said Jim Hmurovich, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “Pinwheel gardens such as these are calls-to-action, encouraging people to volunteer their time and skills, to provide the help to families and children right here in Georgia, help, that each of us, from time to time have needed ourselves.”

To learn more about child abuse prevention activities in Georgia, visit preventchildabusega.org .  To learn more about Pinwheels for Prevention®, visit http://preventchildabuse.org/resource/pinwheels-for-prevention/.

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(Always include this symbol; it signals to the journalist the end of your piece)

ABOUT PREVENT CHILD ABUSE (State or local level)
Insert your own descriptive boilerplate here like the example below

ABOUT PREVENT CHILD ABUSE AMERICA

Prevent Child Abuse America, founded in 1972 and based in Chicago, works to ensure the healthy development of children nationwide. The organization promotes that vision through a network of chapters in 49 states and over 400 Healthy Families America, home visitation sites in 37 states, the Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and Canada. A major organizational focus is to advocate for the existence of a national policy framework and strategy for children and families while promoting evidence-based practices that prevent abuse and neglect from ever occurring. To learn more about what we’re doing to prevent child abuse and neglect and how you can help, please visit our websites preventchildabuse.org and healthyfamiliesamerica.org.

Prevent Child Abuse America, founded in 1972 and based in Chicago, works to ensure the healthy development of children nationwide. The organization promotes that vision through a network of chapters in 49 states and over 400 Healthy Families America, home visitation sites in 37 states, the Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and Canada. A major organizational focus is to advocate for the existence of a national policy framework and strategy for children and families while promoting evidence-based practices that prevent abuse and neglect from ever occurring. To learn more about what we’re doing to prevent child abuse and neglect and how you can help, please visit our websites preventchildabuse.org and healthyfamiliesamerica.org.

Prevent Child Abuse America, founded in 1972 and based in Chicago, works to ensure the healthy development of children nationwide. The organization promotes that vision through a network of chapters in 49 states and over 400 Healthy Families America, home visitation sites in 37 states, the Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and Canada. A major organizational focus is to advocate for the existence of a national policy framework and strategy for children and families while promoting evidence-based practices that prevent abuse and neglect from ever occurring. To learn more about what we’re doing to prevent child abuse and neglect and how you can help, please visit our websites preventchildabuse.org and healthyfamiliesamerica.org.

Prevent Child Abuse America, founded in 1972 in Chicago, works to ensure the healthy development of children nationwide. The organization promotes that vision through a network of chapters in 50 states and nearly 600 sites in 39 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Commonwealth of the Marianas, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands and Canada.  A major organizational focus is to advocate for the existence of a national policy framework and strategy for children and families while promoting evidence-based practices that prevent abuse and neglect from ever occurring. To learn more about what we’re doing to prevent child abuse and neglect and how you can help, please visit www.preventchildabuse.org or www.healthyfamiliesamerica.org.

Press Release Sample 4 – Announcement of CAP Month Events

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

Contact: YOUR MEDIA CONTACT HERE
(W): YOUR DIRECT WORK NUMBER
(C): YOUR DIRECT PHONE NUMBER

PREVENT CHILD ABUSE STATE FILLS APRIL WITH ACTION

Organization to hold events around the state to

mark Child Abuse Prevention Month

 

April is a time for action according to Prevent Child Abuse STATE.  The organization will fill the month with events to increase awareness of child abuse prevention and what community members throughout STATE can do to promote the healthy and happy childhoods all children deserve.

The events will include (LIST THEM HERE, WITH DATES, LOCATIONS, PRICE POINTS IF PAID ADMISSION, ETC) SPONSOR 1, SPONSOR 2 and (OTHERS) are generously supporting these efforts.

“Child Abuse Prevention Month is a time when people are already thinking about children, so it’s the perfect opportunity for each of us to reflect and act upon the ways we can help children, families and our communities thrive,” said First Last, TITLE of Prevent Child Abuse STATE. “We all have a role to play, so our goal this April is to help others recognize that role and the ways in which we can maximize our impact.”

The need to act on behalf of children could not be more urgent.  According to statistics from UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including 32nd out of 34 countries in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being.

“This is unacceptable,” ” said LAST NAME. “Together, we can change that.”

(DESCRIBE THE WAYS PEOPLE CAN DONATE OR OTHERWISE LEND SUPPORT)

“We’re grateful to the sponsors and partners who are helping Prevent Child Abuse STATE engage people in taking action in support of children and families in STATE,” said Jim Hmurovich, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America.  “When communities come together to support children and families, we as a nation benefit.  Events like the ones being conducted throughout STATE will serve as a reminder of the children on whose behalf we are acting in STATE and across the country.”

To learn more about child abuse prevention activities in STATE, visit CHAPTER WEBSITE.  To learn more about Pinwheels for Prevention®, visit http://preventchildabuse.org/resource/pinwheels-for-prevention/.

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Tips: It’s important that Letters to the Editor (LTEs) respond to an event or article in the news. Standalone LTEs have a much lower chance of being published, so when you’re tailoring this sample for your local news, reference a recent news story or emerging community issue. However, if the connection isn’t there or seems tenuous, don’t force it. Also make sure to verify the maximum word count for the media outlet to which you’re sending a letter; if it’s too long it will either be discarded or edited by someone else, sometimes deleting ideas or phrases you thought were critical elements of the letter. Most papers hover around 300 words, but some are higher and lower, so be sure to find out first.

Sample 1 – Short response to article

Letter to the Editor, intended for publication

The recent article by AUTHOR (“Title of story goes here,” Published Date) is a good introduction to Child Abuse Prevention Month. However, I think there were several points in the article that needed to be expanded upon.

First and foremost, we all must recognize the notion that as a community and a nation we can do better. According to UNICEF, the U.S. as a whole lags behind the rest of the international community in making children a priority. The U.S. is ranked 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty, and we rank 26th out of 29th for overall child well-being. We are also ranked in the bottom third of every category that ranks child well-being.

An important first step to improve the current state of affairs is developing a national plan for children that clearly identifies what the national goals for child well-being are, and recognizing the importance of local implementation of community-based strategies to reach those goals.  The national plan must include consistent definitions of what exactly we want for our children, and principles that can be used locally by all sectors of our community to ensure all children get the happy and healthy childhood they deserve. And we need to establish metrics to measure the impact of those strategies.

To really embrace Child Abuse Prevention Month, we need to think nationally but act locally to develop strategies that make sense for a specific community while contributing to an overall improvement in our national child well-being outcomes. This requires serious assessment and discussion about the strengths, opportunities and current services available to a community, as well as the readiness of that community to bring about significant changes.

If we focus on what child well-being means to a particular community, then the local strategies employed will vary but contribute to an overall change in the national attitude about our children and our families. As a nation, we need to recognize that many good things already are happening every time a person volunteers for community service, helps a neighbor in need or modifies corporate policy that promotes the bottom line for the company while being supportive of an employee’s right to have a work-life balance. We must build further on those successes.

During Child Abuse Prevention Month, Prevent Child Abuse Georgia is holding events throughout the state where we discuss these issues and how to solve them. Join us, and help us figure out how to make the United States the best place for children to live, grow and thrive.

Sincerely,

NAME, TITLE


Sample 2 – Stats focused

Letter to the Editor, intended for publication

Each year, April serves as a reminder of our nation’s need to focus on healthy child development. Given our nation’s rank in child well-being according to UNICEF, we need to focus extra hard this year.

Last May, UNICEF released a report showing that the U.S. is ranked 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty, with 23.1% of children living in relative poverty. Other UNICEF reports have shown similar failures of the U.S. to adequately promote healthy children and healthy development; for example a 2011 report shows our country is ranked 26th out of 29th for overall child well-being, and was ranked in the bottom third for every category measured including material well-being, health and safety, education, behaviors and risks, and housing and environment.

Because of statistics like these, as we observe Child Abuse Prevention Month this April, I want to encourage everyone who lives in Georgiato commit to taking steps to help improve these rankings and therefore improve the lives of children and families throughout the country.

We all have a role to play in healthy child development and the prevention of child abuse. People like coaches, teachers, babysitters and health care professionals work with children every day and are already working to move our country toward being a greater place for children. But even if you don’t work with or around children, you still can have a positive impact on their development!

By donating time and money to prevention organizations, taking the time to volunteer for before- or after-school programs, or offering to help families in your own neighborhood, you can have a meaningful impact on the lives of children throughout the community. Actions like these help bring communities together, reduce isolation and help children and families succeed by providing them with the tools and resources for optimal development.

If we all pledge to do each of these activities at least once during the month of April, we can make a real difference. If we continue to take steps like these throughout the year and on, we can help make America the best place in the world for children to grow.

Sincerely,

NAME, TITLE


Sample 3 – Call to action focused

Letter to the editor, intended for publication

We all play a role in the lives of children and their families, and their healthy development is crucial to the future health of STATE.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, and that means that throughout the month Prevent Child Abuse Georgia will be holding events and working hard to let people in communities across Georgia know that promoting the healthy development of children and families is the best way to prevent abuse. We all can work together to achieve this by looking for the unique ways in each of our daily lives that we can use to help promote healthy children and families. For instance, those of us with free-time in the morning could volunteer at local schools or community centers to ensure that before-school programs are well-equipped and prepared to help kids learn!

If you have time in the afternoon, you could volunteer at after-school programs or help coach sports teams to ensure that parents have a safe place for kids to go when they get out of school and before parents typically get home from work. We all can also donate time or money to local organizations like Prevent Child Abuse Georgia that are focused on prevention.

Anyone interested in learning more can visit preventchildabusega.org to learn more about the ways that we can help promote the healthy development of children and families and how that helps prevent child abuse from ever occurring. Log on to find out more about events that may be happening near you, and together we all can help prevent child abuse throughout Georgia.

Sincerely,

NAME, TITLE

Twitter

Tips: Make sure to catalog all tweets you can with the hashtag #PINWHEEL or #GREATCHILDHOODS. Similarly, include calls to action whenever possible. Twitter users are more likely to engage in content that asks a question or that has a picture, video or link that they can easily retweet and share, so try to include as much of this varying content as you can. Additionally, make sure to retweet those that mention you, and reply to those who wish to start a dialogue. It’s very important to interact with your followers!

We also want to encourage you to live-tweet any events you do during April; this helps really build a buzz around your event and brand. When live-tweeting, including your hashtag on every tweet is important, and make sure to thank all of the partners or attendees at your event and encourage them to live-tweet and retweet as well.

Remember to use PCA Georgia social media pages as well as your own organizations
@PCAGeorgia
www.preventchildabusega.org
Facebook

Below are some sample Child Abuse Prevention Month tweets.

• All children deserve #greatchildhoods. Find out what role you can play at preventchildabusega.org.
• We’re working to prevent child abuse before it ever occurs. Help us achieve our mission, give today!
• Great childhoods today mean a more prosperous future for all. Learn how you can help turn great childhoods into bright futures at www.preventchildabusega.org.
• We’re teamed up with @PCAAmerica & @PCAGeorgia to support great childhoods for all children during #pinwheels. Tweet us what role you’re playing!
• Great childhoods last a lifetime. Find out why at www.preventchildabusega.org #pinwheels
• We all have a role to play in the prevention of child abuse. Learn more about what you can do to make a difference at www.preventchildabusega.org.

• Celebrate Child Abuse Prevention Month by planting a #Pinwheel to honor those who helped you or your children have #Greatchildhoods
• We want to make Georgia the best place for children and families to thrive. You probably already play a part in that #greatchildhoods
• Simple, everyday actions are what make #Greatchildhoods a reality. Find out more at (link) #Pinwheel
• We all play a role in the lives of children and families. Simple actions every day can make a big difference, tell us how you make an impact at whatsyourdot.org

Facebook

Tips: Interaction rates on Facebook are highest during non-work hours (beginning after 2 PM and ending before 5 AM), so when you’re posting engaging content, try to do it in the late afternoon. Also, make sure that you’re using content like photos, videos or links in your updates, as they are more engaging than plain text.

Additionally, be sure to always include a call to action such as to share, like or comment, since telling your audience what you want them to do often results in better interaction rates. Of course, it is important also to respond and foster a dialogue. Whether you want to simply like posts or comment back and create a deeper dialogue, you should be doing something that, at a minimum, lets your followers know that they’re being heard.

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month; it is a time to celebrate the good things our communities do to promote healthy child development, as well as a time to reflect on the work that still remains.
  • Support #GreatChildhoods! Visit our site to learn how to help and then post your pinwheel to inspire others to make a difference during Child Abuse Prevention Month!
  • We all have a role to play in healthy child development, and our goal this April is to help others recognize that role and the ways in which we can maximize our impact.
  • When communities come together to support children and families, we all benefit: our fellow citizens are better educated, employees are more effective and miss less work, and we’ll see a profound impact on the quality of life in the communities in which families live.
  • This year, we are focusing on three simple actions you can take to make a difference. You can:
    • Mentor a child or parent.
    • Advocate for policies that support children and families.
    • Donate to child-serving organizations.
  • Each of these actions help increase the protective factors in your community.
    • Mentoring children provides another stable, caring adult in the life of children. As research from Dr. Jack Shonkoff shows, the availability of one stable, caring and supportive relationship between a child and adult caregiver can help children achieve positive outcomes in the face of adversity. Mentoring a parent can limit feelings of isolation and reduce stress on an overburdened parent, reducing risk factors for abuse and neglect.
    • Advocating for policies like MIECHV or CAPTA can help swing support for these laws, resulting in larger appropriations and more funding for the programs and services that work with children and families at a local level. For more information on the importance of these policies, check out the Prevent Child Abuse America Federal Public Policy Agenda for 2017.
    • Donating to child-serving organizations helps keep the doors open and the work going. Donations can be in the form of money or time, as many organizations need volunteers just as much as they need their bills paid. Click here to donate to Prevent Child Abuse Georgia.
  • Once you’ve decided to do something to make a difference in Child Abuse Prevention month, let the world know! Share your story on social media using the hashtag #GreatChildhoods, telling everyone what you did to help make great childhoods for all children a reality in your community. Inspire others to follow in your example and learn how they too can support children and families.

We encourage you to use these samples and variations on these same themes throughout the month. Keep in mind that our messaging research shows us that phrases like “all children deserve great childhoods” and language that connects better childhoods to more prosperous and productive futures tests well with external audiences.

Instagram/Pinterest

Tips: Instagram and Pinterest are especially geared toward photo sharing. Use Instagram like Twitter for photos, with one major difference: #constantly #use #hashtags! While hashtags are important on twitter, they are absolutely critical for Instagram. As an example, imagine a photo of a child holding a pinwheel, you could hashtag it as such: #capmonth #pinwheel #preventchildabuseamerica #preventchildabuseSTATE #happychildren #healthyfamilies #vibrantcommunities #weallplayarole. It seems silly (and honestly, it kind of is!) but it’s important.

For Pinterest, your actions are going to be heavily based around liking and sharing (called “pinning” or “re-pinning”) so make sure to interact with others so they will interact with you! Since Pinterest is photo-based, the best way to use it is to share pictures of your events, of the way you’re using pinwheels, of children at play, what healthy families mean to you, etc. While Pinterest isn’t as good for getting messages out, if you have a really great photo that links back to your website it can be really powerful (and don’t worry about hashtags on Pinterest, they don’t have the same effect they do with twitter or Instagram)

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Helpline PSA

15 seconds:

  • Parenting can be tough, but asking for help doesn’t have to be. 1-800-Children is there for you Monday-Friday from 8am to 6pm to answer your parenting questions and offer guidance and support. Call 1-800-children today. That’s 1-800-244-5373. (Se habla español)
  • Children are always changing, and we all need help from time to time. Call 1-800-CHILDREN for someone who will LISTEN to your questions, HELP you explore your family's options, and CONNECT you with programs in your community. That’s 1-800-244-5373. Call anytime Monday- Friday from 8am to 7pm. (Se habla español)

30 seconds:

  • Let’s face it - kids don’t come with instructions. If you’re a parent and you are feeling frustrated, there is help. First: Talk to someone. Call a friend, a family member or 1-800-CHILDREN. 1-800-CHILDREN can answer your parenting questions –– for free––Monday thru Friday. Second: Join a parent support group, take a parenting class, or seek out individual or family counseling. Third: Be willing to accept help –– from friends, family or neighbors. Start today by calling 1-800-CHILDREN for more information. That’s 1-800-244-5373. (Se habla español)
  • Children are always changing, so whether you’re a new parent with a crying newborn or a veteran parent dealing with teenage angst, call 1-800-CHILDREN, because from time to time we all have questions and we all need support. 1-800-CHILDREN staffs professionals who will LISTEN to your questions, HELP you explore your family's options, and CONNECT you with programs in your community. That’s 1-800-244-5373. Call anytime Monday- Friday from 8am to 7pm. (Se habla español)
  • Concerned about a family or child you know or think they may need some additional support? Do you have some questions about a child or just need some support? Talk to a trained individual who cares and wants to help. Call 1-800-CHILDREN. We connect with you with resources in your community.

Talking Points

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month; it is a time to celebrate the good things our communities do to promote healthy child development, as well as a time to reflect on the work that still remains.
  • We all have a role to play in healthy child development, and our goal this April is to help others recognize that role and the ways in which we can maximize our impact.
  • When communities come together to support children and families, we all benefit: our fellow citizens are better educated, employees are more effective and miss less work, and we’ll see a profound impact on the quality of life in the communities in which families live.
  • Child Abuse Prevention Month is a time when we ask people to think about children and what they and their families need to thrive.
  • We hope you will take this opportunity to begin thinking about children, all children, all year long, and the role you can play in their healthy development.
  • The first step is understanding the importance of early childhood development and the various ways we can create loving, nurturing experiences and environments for our children through services like home visiting and the prevention of bullying, child sexual abuse and abusive head trauma.
  • If you are the CEO of a business, we ask you to discuss strategies with employees that promote a healthy bottom line for the company while recognizing the importance of policies and practices that appreciate work-life balance.
  • But we all aren’t policymakers or senior government officials; yet we, too, have a role to play, sometimes by taking time to help a stressed family, or to volunteer in the community or to simply take the time to become more educated on the importance of healthy childhood experiences and environments to the successful transition of a child to a contributing member of a community.
  • To remind all of us about the importance of healthy child development, pinwheels have been established as the new national symbol for child abuse prevention.  They serve as a visual reminder that all children deserve an equal opportunity for healthy, happy and care-free childhoods.
  • The Pinwheels for Prevention® campaign has seen more than 3 million pinwheels distributed nationwide since April 2008. Their presence has resulted in increased awareness, expanded dialogue and community engagement around the healthy development of all children and the prevention of child abuse before it ever occurs.
  • “Pinwheel gardens” planted in communities across the nation are visual reminders that we all play a role in ensuring happy and healthy childhoods for all children everywhere.
  • According to UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including 32nd out of 34 countries in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being.
  • Each year, child abuse costs the U.S. upward of $80 billion. But if we prevent the abuse and neglect from ever occurring in the first place, that same amount of money could:
  • Help send 1 million children to college.
  • Pay the yearly salaries of 2 million teachers.
  • Eliminate the hospital bills for 8 million new parents
  • In honor of Child Abuse Prevention Month, we encourage everyone to commit to the below actions, and share what you’ve done with us via email, Twitter, Facebook, blog, Vine, Instagram or whatever social media platform you prefer:
  • Offering to help a parent or family in your neighborhood
  • Volunteering at a local child-serving program
  • Donating money to organizations that serve children and promote abuse prevention
  • Simple actions like these can go a long way!
  • At Prevent Child Abuse STATE this April, in conjunction with Child Abuse Prevention Month, we are (INSERT ACTIVITIES) and we want to share these activities with the public, so please share them via Twitter, Facebook, blog, Vine, Instagram or whatever social media platform you prefer, and then let us know you’ve done so.
  • To learn more about the roles you can play in support of children and families in Georgia, visit preventchildabusega.org or call 404-413-1419

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Prevent Child Abuse America Brand Video

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Make Child Abuse Prevention a Community Thing

  • Plant a Pinwheel Garden, get local organizations or business to sponsor the pinwheels. Then plant them in a location where the community can see (Town Hall, School, Church, Library, etc...)
  • Find a restaurant in your community that does percent nights and get the community to attend to support Prevent Child Abuse Georgia.
  • Request 1-800-CHILDREN helpline/ child abuse prevention material from Prevent Child Abuse Georgia to give out at local festivals or have in schools, churches or community centers.

Contact Julia Neighbors, jneighbors@gsu.edu, 404-413-1419, for more information on how to get pinwheels, for more ideas, or to share what your community is doing!!!

Here are some pinwheel garden ideas

Urban GardenIMG_9048 In prominent community locationsIMG_8984
Place Pinwheels in community/ family areas, festivals or eventspinwheelcen Create a Pinwheel Garden competition in your community by using #hashtags or submitting pictures  #ATLPINWHEELwooddruffpark

 

View an example of how an agencies implemented Pinwheels for Prevention.

PFP community Example

Here is a great example of a city, College Park, doing a press release and then planting pinwheels all over their City Hall.

Check out the community event PCA Pickens did!!!

 

 

WHEREAS, children are key to the state's future success, prosperity, and quality of life and, while children are our most valuable resource, they are also our most vulnerable; and

 

WHEREAS, children have a right to be safe and to be provided an opportunity to thrive, learn, and grow; and

 

WHEREAS, child abuse and neglect can be prevented by supporting and strengthening Georgia’s families, thus preventing the far-reaching effects of maltreatment, providing the opportunity for children to develop healthy, trusting family bonds; and consequently, building the foundations of communities; and

 

WHEREAS, we must come together as partners so that the voices of our children are heard by all and we are as a community extending a helping hand to children and families in need; and

 

WHEREAS, by providing safe, stable, nurturing relationships and environments for our children, free of violence, abuse and neglect, we can ensure that Georgia’s children will grow to their full potential as the next generation of leaders, helping to secure the future of this state and nation; and

 

Therefore, I, Nathan Deal, Governor of the State of Georgia, do hereby proclaim April 2016,

 

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION MONTH